Nice to meet you! My name is Loes Voermans.

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I am a student at the Eindhoven University of Technology at the faculty of Industrial Design. I am currently in my second year of my bachelor.

I am a designer who is continuously taking the user and society into account. I do this because I am well aware of the consequences of innovation and the impact it has on the user and society. Take for example the innovation of cars which had not only an impact to the user of the car, but also to society as a whole since greater distances could be reached in a shorter amount of time. Also the railway was used less which had consequences for the railroad company.
I believe that to make a successful design, I have to communicate continuously with the (future) user. I am a proponent of co-creation. By not only communicating with the user, but letting the user participate in the design process, many design mistakes can be foreseen and prevented and the product will have a higher success rate.
Throughout my education I followed many courses to improve my skills in positioning and marketing of new products. Examples of courses are a course in which I’ve learned how to spot trends and use these trends to define what is already on the market, which will help me creating new innovations or a course in which we specialized on designing for different cultures.

Paths

Paths is an interactive educational toolkit for children in high school. It is designed to provide pupils a clear overview of the project they are working on. It includes a step by step reflective tool which helps them in reflecting consequently and effectively. This tool helps the children keep track of the things they have done, how they have done it and how satisfied they are with their results.
Paths is applicable to many processes and methods, but the toolkit provides a design process and a research process. The middle tile can be swapped out to change the amount of steps the children will have to follow during their project. This gives the teacher the possibility to scale the tool for the intended lesson.
By using Paths the teacher can provide children with a structured and engaging tool, while they keep their autonomy. The pupils can quickly look back on their process and precisely identify what and how they have learned.

How does it work?

The video below contains a short explanation of the goal and working of the concept and prototype.

My contribution

I contributed the most in doing user tests and talking to experts. Every iteration I tested the new design with our target group. I mostly focused on improving the effectiveness and autonomy of the game. Next to that I focused on the business aspect of Paths by designing an unique selling point and values for the stakeholders.

GoOut

GoOut gives a new interactive dimension to the, as perceived normal by society, concept of a ball. GoOut is an interactive ball that stimulates children to play by making them curious. When GoOut is not used, it will mysteriously glow to seek the attention of the child. Due to movement GoOut can shine different colored lights and play music. The interaction between the child and GoOut encourages physical activity. Through exploration the child will find out all the possible functions of GoOut. Moving it around will cause the colors to change rapidly, but when left alone, it will mysteriously glow. When the attention is pulled and the children start throwing it around, music starts playing to keep them going.

How does it work?

The video below contains an impression on how GoOut works.

My contribution

I mainly focused on creating the user experience so that the user tests would be as valuable as possible. For this project we used co creation as a source for further development of the user experience. Since we were working with children, we had to simplify the process and prototype to make it understandable. I learned how to use an Arduino for prototyping, which I used for creating the user experience. I did research into curiosity.